Pressure Games Toy Blog

 

Pressure Games is happy to announce that we have joined Pledge 1%.

In their own words:

“Pledge 1% is a global movement to create a new normal where giving back is integrated into the DNA of companies of all sizes. Pledge 1% encourages and challenges founders and companies to Pledge 1% of equity, profit, product, and/or time to causes of their choosing. Over 5,000 companies in 100 countries have joined the movement, including Twilio, Glassdoor, Box, Yelp, General Assembly, Docusign, Salesforce, Atlassian, and Techstars.”

Pressure Games is a young start up- but we want to stick a stake in the ground early and build our business based on a mission that doesn’t just serve a profit, but also a conscious company culture, thoughtful product development, inclusive business goals, and active community partnerships for good.

We are so excited to announce that we are shipping test versions of Countdown to reviewers and parents! We're looking for anyone that could make a great tester, whether you have kids or are a kid at heart, to help provide feedback on our innovative hide & seek toy as well as spread the word.

If you are interested in getting Countdown, or know someone would would be a great tester, please sign up for the Countdown Club below. We're selecting a group of early testers every week and would love to have you involved!

Sign up to the Countdown Club 

And don't forget to share with with your friends!

Over the last 6 months, we've gone through 4 different iterations of the electronics in Countdown. Each revision has added and removed some features, changed the shape and size of the case we can use, and, most importantly, each revision has progressively been easier to assemble. That last point is critical because each little piece on our boards are currently hand-placed. Each new part to place adds a few minutes to our assembly time and, over the course of dozens of boards, that time adds up (and increases the chances of a mistake).

Below we take a stroll down memory lane and describe the changes over in both functionality and cost of the guts of Countdown.

Bringing a new toy or piece of tech to market is a painstaking process. No matter what you envision or plan, once your shiny new object lands in the hands of someone else (especially when your target audience is kids).. they'll immediately find something wrong. Some button is too hard to press, some light too bright or dim, some combination of standing on one foot while looking with only their left eye prevents some feature from working. 

And have I mentioned how good kids are at foiling your best-laid plans? After months of testing, we've come to the conclusion that if you could give a group of kids an armored tank, they would find a way to break it... in minutes. They're amazing like that!

In order to keep up with our testing plans and testers themselves, we have to create a lot of Countdown toys. Unlike manufacturing, where thousands of identical units are stamped out, during development, we need hundreds of units that change a little (or a lot) each time. Unfortunately, there's not an easy way to automate everything at small scales to accomplish that goal. While it's true that our 3D printer is running 24 hours a day, non-stop, every day, there are some things that just have to be done by hand at this stage of development. It's the only way to allow for maximum flexibility and rapid turnaround times. The main focus of this post, and the item that requires the most elbow grease at this point, is the electronic circuit board we developed.

Countdown is an exciting toy for playing hide and seek. In addition to being a small toy that can be hidden anywhere, it adds a timed element to win. Once hidden, whoever is finding Countdown has to find it and beat a set of puzzles using the game buttons, lights and sounds. When developing the puzzles, we established a set of guidelines for how each puzzle should challenge the player. These guidelines are meant to make sure that each puzzle throws something different at the user and, if when done well, there will be some puzzles that you're better that than others. The end-goal is a hide & seek game that the excitement doesn't just end when the toy is found.

Puzzle Development Guidelines

With 6 buttons, each with a bright multi-color light, and our screen for instructions, there's a lot of variety to each puzzle we create. At the concept stage, we categorize each puzzle into one (or more) of the following groups:

  • Reflex - Puzzles that require quick movements to hit a button at a specific time.
  • Cognitive - Use your brain to figure out a reading, math or other challenge to proceed.
  • Memory - Remember a light, sound or text pattern and repeat some or all of it.